Anyone with a computer can help cure diseases!
#1
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By downloading a piece of software and signing up for Rosetta@home, you are helping scientists find important energy values for important proteins implicated in disease like malaria,HIV and cancer! You will donate some of your CPU time and hard disk to analyze important protein parameters. If you have a recent computer, decently powerful graphics card and no ceiling internet download plan, you could help!
Go here
And if we many Nirmukta users to sign up and dedicate a few hours of CPU time every day , I can create a Nirmukta Team on the project website and all our subsequent contributions (measured in points) would be reflected there! Do let me know what you users think! All for a good cause! Spread the scientific word.
"It's alright, I rarely meet anyone who's able to read it properly. Although personally, I never thought that it to be an odd of a name. Once I give people the pronunciation, they tend to remember my name by easily associating me with it. A unique face, a unique moniker."
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#2
That's a great idea, Nick.

At work, we're already dedicating our resources to Folding@home.
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#3
(20-Jul-2011, 11:00 AM)Pratibha Wrote: That's a great idea, Nick.

At work, we're already dedicating our resources to Folding@home.

Awesome, I'm happy (and surprised that the company admin allowed you to install this) about this Thumbup ! I already emailed my Alma mater's biotech department and asked him to do the same. But no reply yet! Sad
Every little helps,what say?

Peace Flowers
Nick.
"It's alright, I rarely meet anyone who's able to read it properly. Although personally, I never thought that it to be an odd of a name. Once I give people the pronunciation, they tend to remember my name by easily associating me with it. A unique face, a unique moniker."
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#4
Wasn't there a similar program for Xboxes? I remember reading something about five years ago or so where one could connect their Xbox up to a server or computer that would use it's CPU to run calculations. I think it's a great idea but I've never done it before.
Ursula - Has anyone ever used Kareo for billing patients?
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#5
(20-Jul-2011, 11:00 AM)Pratibha Wrote: That's a great idea, Nick.

At work, we're already dedicating our resources to Folding@home.

Nice, I heard about this when it came out, but haven't really contributed. For many years I contributed to SETI@home, the one that started it all.

(30-Aug-2011, 11:42 PM)UrsulaT Wrote: Wasn't there a similar program for Xboxes? I remember reading something about five years ago or so where one could connect their Xbox up to a server or computer that would use it's CPU to run calculations. I think it's a great idea but I've never done it before.

Interesting. I wouldn't have thought an Xbox could provide that much processing power, but I guess every little bit counts.

"Fossil rabbits in the Precambrian"
~ J.B.S.Haldane, on being asked to falsify evolution.
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#6
(31-Aug-2011, 09:17 PM)Ajita Kamal Wrote: Interesting. I wouldn't have thought an Xbox could provide that much processing power, but I guess every little bit counts.

There are some particular types of calculations which are more faster on GPUs and gaming consoles having quite a bit of graphics processing power. To get the equivalent power in a PC, it would need a dedicated graphics card which can cost more than Rs. 5000 (I could be wrong. It's been a long time since I gave up PC gaming).

On PS3, Folding@home can run about 10x faster on a than on a PC because it takes advantage of the hardware:

Quote:People often use the number of floating point operations per second (FLOPS) as a metric for the speed of a computer. One question that arises is how to compare machines with radically different architectures. In particular, what requires only a few operations (or even just a single operation) on one machine could require many operations on another. Classic examples are evaluations of functions like the exp(x) or sin(x). On GPU and Cell hardware, functions like this can often be calculated very quickly, say in one cycle, while this is often counted as 10-20 operations for other machines.
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#7
Here's some recent coverage of an initiative to recruit lay PC-user populations in research questions like the Protein Folding Problem.

Here's the resource page for the program foldit. Here is a shoutout from Steven Novella.
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#8
(20-Sep-2011, 04:34 AM)arvindiyer Wrote: Here's some recent coverage of an initiative to recruit lay PC-user populations in research questions like the Protein Folding Problem.

That is plain amazing.
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#9
The following TED talk by Prof. Jay Bradner of Harvard provides an inspirational case study underlining the urgency, and the promise, of open-source and crowd-sourcing efforts in medical research.
http://www.ted.com/talks/jay_bradner_ope...earch.html
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#10
The winning idea of getting gamers to do science seems to have been catching on over the years and here's a Guardian article giving a Top 10 list of such games.
How online gamers are solving science's biggest problems

Anyone here who's played any of these games? Any additions to the Top 10 list in the article?
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