Burqa bans. What do you think about it?
#25
(14-Nov-2011, 12:05 PM)nispat Wrote: For the matter of fact, I found that Indian Sari is most constraining clothing for Indian women. Can we have some opinion on that?

Im sure it can be constraining in many ways. Let's also keep in mind that the modern sari was not the norm all over India until recently. For much of its history the masses of rural women have draped cloth about them in various ways, some of which conferred at least as much freedom of movement as a dothi/veti. Even today in some parts of rural India women wear the sari in less restrictive ways. But no doubt, the modern "civilized" way of wearing the sari is restrictive.

Anyway, if we're just talking about the modern sari, this is a question that is best answered by a woman.
"Fossil rabbits in the Precambrian"
~ J.B.S.Haldane, on being asked to falsify evolution.
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#26
Speaking of sarees, there are unmistakable regional styles in draping them and there is even a book on the subject.

This article entitled "The Sari Doesn't Need Saving" offers an interesting take on how the untailored saree offers so much leeway for sartorial innovation:

Quote:The sari, in a way, is the antithesis of the kimono. The kimono is a structured, multi-layered garment with many parts, all of which are meticulously tailored in advance before they are finally assembled on the woman with ties and sashes....The sari, by contrast, is formless and fluid. It moulds itself to the shape of the woman, highlighting—rather than obscuring—her special configuration. If a kimono is like a cloak that swaddles a woman, a sari is like a veil that hides or flaunts what a woman chooses. The sari’s formlessness opens up endless possibilities.
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#27
(04-May-2010, 10:14 AM)manju Wrote: Well, in my opinion, you can still wear an atheist T-shirt to work. It's a personal choice and not dictated by an atheist scripture. If one is not a Muslim woman she can wear the burkha and go out. It's again a personal choice.

Well, I think it would be socially naive to say that anyone can wear Burqa even if she is not muslim.
Please don't go too far in your attempt to think freely. Never Mind.
Though people can wear whatever they want to except if its a sign of oppression like burqa.
But Hijab ie modest clothing is not oppression. I mean Burqa is really outdated, ancient, orthodox apparel. Yeah, you can wear it on fancy dress or cultural festival, but not in day to day life of today's world and really derogatory is the excuse to wear it ie protecting women from men's gaze. Yeah,its derogatory to both women as well as men.

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#28
As Pat Condell says, if we were an honest society, there would be no need to ban the burka, because it would have been ridiculed out of existence.

The attitude toward the burka should be similar to how society would treat a Nazi swastika (yes, Godwin), or a KKK costume. It really has no place in civilized society. Religious freedom seems to bring along religious immunity, for some reason and so gets too much respect. An public awareness campaign would be the most effective, but unfortunately free speech is a commodity controlled by extremists.

The burka could be banned in professional workplaces, simply because of the symbol of oppression and negativity that it is, just as it is not part of formal attire. Else where, it's a free choice. But that doesn't mean everyone has to like it and oblige it.

What makes the burka particularly offensive, to men, is that it solidifies the notion that males are raging barbarians, who are constant sex-maniacs unable to refrain themselves from raping a woman who shows any flesh.
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