Campaign started by a harassment victim in Bangalore
#1
Hi

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=5...954&ref=ts

This is a campaign started by Veena after she was harassed in Majestic (Bangalore's min bus stand) in the middle of the day by a couple of people. Seems there were tons of people around and none came to the rescue.

My friend went through the same thing in Indra Nagar a couple of weeks back and from what I hear it seems common place occurrence.

This campaign seems like a nice idea. But like everything else, I feel the general public momentum will die in a couple of weeks and everything will go back to its hellish normality.

What can we do about this? This isnt just about eve-teasing and girls. Its a general problem, but very obvious for women! Somehow these assoles think its ok and frustratingly enough they get away with it most of the time. Just wanted to spark some discussion.
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#2
Very good initiative. I've joined the group, but I feel the same way as you do- that it will lose momentum soon. A more practical way forward would be to donate and contribute in other kind to established women's rights organizations in India. But such facebook groups also help, because they increase public awareness by presenting a very human side of the story, which helps demonstrate and publicize the ugliness of such misogynistic and depraved behaviors seen among so many men in India.
"Fossil rabbits in the Precambrian"
~ J.B.S.Haldane, on being asked to falsify evolution.
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#3
I have joined and also invited some friends to join.[/align]
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#4
I was attacked once in Bangalore. And neither the cops nor the general public did much about it. These groups might create some awareness and may provide some people with the balls to actually help someone in trouble. But the real root of the problem is the lack of education and the attitude that the attackers have.
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#5
Got to appreciate veena for what she did in this very difficult of circumstances, and a situation that one is not prepared for. Spreading knowledge about this will at least prepare others if they ever face such a situation.
(I recently faced a much simpler situation where some guy just cut across a long line that I was in, and when I confronted him, he ignored me. During that brief confrontation, I happened to tap him on his shoulder. A few minutes later, when I protested again.. he whipped out his badge, and he turned out to be a policeman in plain clothes. And he matter-of-fact told me that if I put my hand on him again, he will arrest me, and I backed off. In retrospect, I should have gone further.. but the lesson learnt is that we need to be prepared for happenings that come out of nowhere. Which is one reason why I find Veena's action very courageous.)

Its pretty upsetting that the crowd does nothing. Reminds me of Dr Kamath's blogs about how India historically grooms us all for inaction. But lets each decide that if we ever see this before our eyes, we will step up and try to uphold justice. Here's some brief thoughts on passive stance by Dr Martin Luther King from his "Letter From Birmingham Jail" that I saw on a blog recently.

Quote:First, I must confess that over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to “order” than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: “I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action”; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a “more convenient season.” Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has - Margaret Mead
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#6
Veena is now quite distressed about the response of the paper Bangalore Mirror. Their article posts a picture of her and says that she was a victim of sexual abuse. Veena is now at pains on her FB group to clear up that it was "eve teasing" and not sexual abuse.

Here is the article: http://www.bangaloremirror.com/index.asp...2856db3699

I think many of us here, have agreed that "eve teasing" is not an accurate term for what happened. It should be called sexual harassment (IMO), but she seems to be quite distressed with the use of the term sexual abuse in the paper. It seems to stem from a perception of a "tarnished" image in society. I don't like that part very much, but I feel it has some truth to it, though I am loathe to admit it.

Are you in agreement with me? Should we reiterate this on the FB forum too? I tried saying it in a comment on Veena's FB group, but I wonder what the reaction will be.
Aditya Manthramurthy
Web Administrator & Associate Editor
Nirmukta.com
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#7
This quote below is from the last part of the article I posted in the previous reply. The paper seems to be going to great lengths to sell more copies. The stories below sound wild, but though I will not discount the possibility of their truth, I think they fairly unverifiable stories - and could very well be fabricated by the paper.

Quote:A common affair

“I used to stay at Malleswaram 7th Cross and some boys used to drop their pants and masturbate in front of me every time I walked by alone. The street lighting was never good and some of them used to grope my behind when they passed by on their bikes”
- Rohini, 24, post graduate student

“It’s very common for guys to follow us when we are riding back alone from college or from shopping. I have been frequently followed by men. They blare their horns and sometime block the way.”
- Ankita, 23, student of M P Birla Institute of Management

“Sometimes even auto drivers indulge in such acts, especially when the girl is alone. It’s scary.”
- Parneeta, 23, also a post graduate student
Aditya Manthramurthy
Web Administrator & Associate Editor
Nirmukta.com
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#8
@Donatello,

I would believe these stories for the simple reason that many of my friends (girls) have narrated stories to me that are far more outrageous. Additionally, several surveys (whether accurate or not) have shown that a majority of women have had to face some sort of such lewd behavior at some point of time in their lives. It is pathetic.

Edit: it is possible that the newspaper fabricated reports, but the incidents itself don't seem implausible. That's what I meant.
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#9
(27-Aug-2010, 03:52 PM)donatello Wrote: Veena is now quite distressed about the response of the paper Bangalore Mirror. Their article posts a picture of her and says that she was a victim of sexual abuse. Veena is now at pains on her FB group to clear up that it was "eve teasing" and not sexual abuse.

Here is the article: http://www.bangaloremirror.com/index.asp...2856db3699

I think many of us here, have agreed that "eve teasing" is not an accurate term for what happened. It should be called sexual harassment (IMO), but she seems to be quite distressed with the use of the term sexual abuse in the paper. It seems to stem from a perception of a "tarnished" image in society. I don't like that part very much, but I feel it has some truth to it, though I am loathe to admit it.

Are you in agreement with me? Should we reiterate this on the FB forum too? I tried saying it in a comment on Veena's FB group, but I wonder what the reaction will be.

I agree with everything you've said, donatello, and also agree with all the thread posters above.
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#10
(27-Aug-2010, 03:52 PM)donatello Wrote: Veena is now quite distressed about the response of the paper Bangalore Mirror. Their article posts a picture of her and says that she was a victim of sexual abuse. Veena is now at pains on her FB group to clear up that it was "eve teasing" and not sexual abuse.

Here is the article: http://www.bangaloremirror.com/index.asp...2856db3699

I think many of us here, have agreed that "eve teasing" is not an accurate term for what happened. It should be called sexual harassment (IMO), but she seems to be quite distressed with the use of the term sexual abuse in the paper. It seems to stem from a perception of a "tarnished" image in society. I don't like that part very much, but I feel it has some truth to it, though I am loathe to admit it.

Are you in agreement with me? Should we reiterate this on the FB forum too? I tried saying it in a comment on Veena's FB group, but I wonder what the reaction will be.

I agree with you well said.

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#11
Rashid got the idea to organise the event from activists of One Billion Rising for Justice. One Billion Rising revolves around the theme that one billion women suffer violence and one billion people across the world stand up against that violence. The campaign is active in 207 countries.
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