Fellow Earthlings
#1
Fellow Earthlings,
How ya'll doing ?

Hi, I'm Amardeep, originally frm Gurgaon, nw working here in Manila, Philippines. An Aviator by profession.

Would love to make some new like-minded frnds here.

Regards to all.
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#2
(28-Jul-2013, 04:25 PM)aviator_ad Wrote: Fellow Earthlings,
How ya'll doing ?

Hi, I'm Amardeep, originally frm Gurgaon, nw working here in Manila, Philippines. An Aviator by profession.

Would love to make some new like-minded frnds here.

Regards to all.

Welcome to the forums!

There's the tired cliche about there being no atheists in foxholes, and it's great to hear that there are atheists in cockpits!

It will be great to hear more about 'high-altitude freethought' and about whether adopting freethinking has led to any new personal approach to your flying career. How true, in your experience, is the conventional wisdom that members of high-responsibility and high-risk professions maybe more susceptible to religious belief? In your experience, how often do true-blue aviators lapse into superstitious ritual like some on-ground space personnel, or for that matter, like some sportspersons?
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#3
Hi,

Well, two things here.

Firstly, the Airplane has shown us the true face of Earth, the way its meant to be. For me personally flying releases me from the tyranny of petty things that our society is plagued with.

Coming to how has free-thought effected my flying career, well, i can confidently say it has carved me into a much more adaptable & proficient pilot. In any kinda emergency, which btw has hapnd couple of times already, i don't lose hope or beg on my knees for some divine power to intervene & save us. I very well undrstnd if thr's anybdy who can help us its me, so rather than panicking i immediately start looking for solutions or whts best in the current situation.

Secondly, unfortunately majority of the pilots u'd come across still are ardent followers, just like any othr high-risk job, i wouldn't wanna fly with someone of that sort next to me who trusts in some invisible imaginary & hypothetical power to save him rather than his own instincts & skills bt thts the sad story.



(29-Jul-2013, 05:45 AM)arvindiyer Wrote:
(28-Jul-2013, 04:25 PM)aviator_ad Wrote: Fellow Earthlings,
How ya'll doing ?

Hi, I'm Amardeep, originally frm Gurgaon, nw working here in Manila, Philippines. An Aviator by profession.

Would love to make some new like-minded frnds here.

Regards to all.

Welcome to the forums!

There's the tired cliche about there being no atheists in foxholes, and it's great to hear that there are atheists in cockpits!

It will be great to hear more about 'high-altitude freethought' and about whether adopting freethinking has led to any new personal approach to your flying career. How true, in your experience, is the conventional wisdom that members of high-responsibility and high-risk professions maybe more susceptible to religious belief? In your experience, how often do true-blue aviators lapse into superstitious ritual like some on-ground space personnel, or for that matter, like some sportspersons?
[+] 2 users Like aviator_ad's post
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#4
(29-Jul-2013, 08:47 AM)aviator_ad Wrote: Coming to how has free-thought effected my flying career, well, i can confidently say it has carved me into a much more adaptable & proficient pilot. In any kinda emergency, which btw has hapnd couple of times already, i don't lose hope or beg on my knees for some divine power to intervene & save us.

I happened to read this inspirational profile of a proficient pilot and exemplary crisis-responder Squadron Leader Ronnie Mitra in the latest issue of Outlook.
Flight guru (Mysore Diary, V Gangadhar)
The article narrates how one of those who had a narrow escape thanks to Ronnie Mitra said, "“Thank heavens for Ronnie Mitra.”. Some unspecified heavens receive eventual credit thanks to quirks in our routine use of language, when what was rightly meant was, "This safe landing is thanks to Ronnie Mitra." Forgetting to give credit where it is really due and instead claiming favours by fortune is a habit that seems to die hard.
The profile is also reassuring in a way (or maybe unnerving for some Wink), as it shows how sticklers to standard-operating-procedures need not be conformist automatons.
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#5
I hope in the coming decades we can have more free thinkers in all of the high risk jobs, i can assure its gonna be way more efficient & safer.

"Thanks heaven" for ronnie mitra. U can see to wht extent this childhood imposing of beliefs which i'd say is no less than "child abuse" has effected our conscious & unconscious actions.

It takes real courage to break all shackles of religious indoctrination, courage just to have an open mind, which unfortunately majority of our species is still struggling with.


(17-Aug-2013, 01:16 AM)arvindiyer Wrote:
(29-Jul-2013, 08:47 AM)aviator_ad Wrote: Coming to how has free-thought effected my flying career, well, i can confidently say it has carved me into a much more adaptable & proficient pilot. In any kinda emergency, which btw has hapnd couple of times already, i don't lose hope or beg on my knees for some divine power to intervene & save us.

I happened to read this inspirational profile of a proficient pilot and exemplary crisis-responder Squadron Leader Ronnie Mitra in the latest issue of Outlook.
Flight guru (Mysore Diary, V Gangadhar)
The article narrates how one of those who had a narrow escape thanks to Ronnie Mitra said, "“Thank heavens for Ronnie Mitra.”. Some unspecified heavens receive eventual credit thanks to quirks in our routine use of language, when what was rightly meant was, "This safe landing is thanks to Ronnie Mitra." Forgetting to give credit where it is really due and instead claiming favours by fortune is a habit that seems to die hard.
The profile is also reassuring in a way (or maybe unnerving for some Wink), as it shows how sticklers to standard-operating-procedures need not be conformist automatons.
Reply
#6
This documentary segment describes a program in which 'recruits are given special training to change the way their brains react to fear', in a profession that tops high-risk lists, in whose ranks one may find a ready market for talismans and an eager audience for chaplains. Some items in the 'mental toughness program' which helped trainees perform better in tasks involving 'exposure therapy' and 'controlled/planned harassment', are (i) goal-setting (ii) mental rehearsal (iii) self-talk (iv) arousal control.





Here are some questions in an aviation context.

(i) What are some 'civilian versions' of emergency response training offered to aviators, that can be adopted by laypersons to become better responders when the need arises?
(ii) Besides the routine safety briefing during passenger flights, what else would a pilot expect a well-prepared passenger to know and what sort of attitude would the pilot expect an ideal passenger to adopt?
[+] 1 user Likes arvindiyer's post
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#7
Hi,

Well, most of the people don't realize tht pilots go through yrs of intense training to prepare thm for the worst possible situations, bt every once in a while thr's always somethn tht catches thm Off-guard. It is in situations like these tht the true mental strength of the individual comes into play. Qualities like tenacity & calm head can make all the difference. Pilot are no superhumans, bt great pilots have these two qualities: first they never ever give up, no matter wht. Secondly, they have very calm heads, rather than panicking they instantly switch to response mode & to be honest nobody is born with these things, one can learn & adapt with practice & exposure. This kinda approach is applicable to every profession as well life in general i believe.


Regarding what else would a pilot expect a well-prepared passenger to know and what sort of attitude would the pilot expect an ideal passenger to adopt? ummm, i'd say plz do take those briefings seriously, they actually make a difference & always stay calm, even in adverse situations, whn ppl start to panic thts wht makes the rescue difficult. If they just follow the instructions its gonna be fine, i mean imagine all it takes for the biggest passenger jetliner to evacuate all pax is 90 sec.

Stay sharp, stay safe.

Regards.

(18-Aug-2013, 12:41 AM)arvindiyer Wrote: This documentary segment describes a program in which 'recruits are given special training to change the way their brains react to fear', in a profession that tops high-risk lists, in whose ranks one may find a ready market for talismans and an eager audience for chaplains. Some items in the 'mental toughness program' which helped trainees perform better in tasks involving 'exposure therapy' and 'controlled/planned harassment', are (i) goal-setting (ii) mental rehearsal (iii) self-talk (iv) arousal control.





Here are some questions in an aviation context.

(i) What are some 'civilian versions' of emergency response training offered to aviators, that can be adopted by laypersons to become better responders when the need arises?
(ii) Besides the routine safety briefing during passenger flights, what else would a pilot expect a well-prepared passenger to know and what sort of attitude would the pilot expect an ideal passenger to adopt?
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