Hello All
#1
Hello All,
i had been hovering around the "deist" spectrum for about 4 or 5 years and sitting on fence for about an year and finally relieved to have clarity of being an atheist bout 6 months back. Am from a malayalee syrian christian ( Mar thoma) family, mom relatively religious and dad is not but church and church community is very important. Got married bout 4 years back to a muslim, conveniently and selectively religious. We had both Muslim and Christian weddings with both the families not knowing the "other" wedding. we have both "converted" into both the groups to make the weddings happen, which i think was a big mistake now. We have been graced with an absolutely fantastic and fabulous son last year. We baptized our son last December and during the primitive and incoherent ceremony i realised that i am an atheist and need to be proud of it.
There are still so many things and questions i am struggling with and i know it will get cleared along the way. and i guess one of the main things was the dearth of being part of a community. am glad i found this one. The next really disturbing question for me right now is how do Indian atheist' handle the physical aspect of death, is there a burial ground, a cremation center?? Will be a little more mentally at peace once i get to know this.

hope to meet or converse with all you guys soon.
cheers
Arun Sam
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#2
Welcome to the forums.

(21-May-2013, 05:26 PM)arunsamvarghese Wrote: The next really disturbing question for me right now is how do Indian atheist' handle the physical aspect of death, is there a burial ground, a cremation center?? Will be a little more mentally at peace once i get to know this.

There are a few threads here about how rites of final passage can be trying times for atheists and how they have attempted to respond. Narendra Nayak, President, FIRA, provides some first-hand accounts in this article, and in the comment-trail, mentions an option besides cremation or burial. A wider-ranging discussion on responses to suffering and grief that are true to secular humanist convictions, can be read here.
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#3
thank you arvind, will go through it.
regards
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