Why is eating beef prohibited in Hinduism?
#13
(14-Sep-2010, 06:43 PM)Shantanu Wrote: Up until recently, I was a theist Hindu who adhered to all aspects of our religion including not eating beef even though I ate the meat of lamb, goat, chicken and fish. I believed it was due to the thought that Sri Krishna was a cow herd and so we should have respect for cows.

Nowhere have I found a reasonable justification for banning of beef consumption as part of the Hindu way of life. I am posting this here so that I may obtain the views and findings of others more enlightened than me on why it is that Hindus do not eat beef.

As an atheist now I do not any longer feel the need for paying respects to a God such as Sri Krishna or any other God to whom this traditional custom is attributed. If Aghoris can eat human meat, and all things here are Brahman (Sarve Khalu Idam Brahma) we should not have any dietary restrictions. That is what atheistic advaita that I believe in says.

Any comments?
Who knows why these irrational food taboos came about? Wikipedia lists all the food taboos around the world here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_taboo. Muslims don't like pork, Jews don't like Shrimp, Hindus don't like Beef and so on. However, when the conditions call for it, all these religionists will gladly eat anything available. For instance, I know an orthodox Hindu person who had to eat beef when they went to a European country for studies and could not get any kind of vegetarian food. It seems that these products (pigs, shrimp, cows) were available in plenty in all those regions where they were banned and not killing and eating them was no big loss to the common populace.

However, note that in India, certain castes and Muslims continued to eat beef throughout most historical eras as possibly cows produced more meat and were cheaper(?).

I remember when I was religious and ate some "forbidden food", I felt so guilty that I wanted to "purify" my "sin" somehow. Basically, I think the food taboos (along with all other superstitions) work on a basis of guilt creation on the part of the so-called wrongdoer so that they will do some kind of purification to get rid of their so-called sin. It is a form of mind control. It seems these dietary laws along with other irrational superstitions are created by priestly classes in various societies to keep the lay religious people under their control.
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#14
I love cheeseburgers smile
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#15
(19-Sep-2010, 05:44 AM)ayyawar Wrote: I love cheeseburgers smile

In which country are they sold?
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#16
Lot of countries, US, UK, where beef is official
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#17
(19-Sep-2010, 10:10 PM)ayyawar Wrote: Lot of countries, US, UK, where beef is official

You also get beef burgers in many restaurants in Bangalore and other Indian cities.
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#18
(19-Sep-2010, 03:02 PM)Shantanu Wrote:
(19-Sep-2010, 05:44 AM)ayyawar Wrote: I love cheeseburgers smile

In which country are they sold?

I'm pretty sure you can get them in almost every single country on earth.
"Fossil rabbits in the Precambrian"
~ J.B.S.Haldane, on being asked to falsify evolution.
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#19
(20-Sep-2010, 09:05 AM)Ajita Kamal Wrote:
(19-Sep-2010, 03:02 PM)Shantanu Wrote:
(19-Sep-2010, 05:44 AM)ayyawar Wrote: I love cheeseburgers smile

In which country are they sold?

I'm pretty sure you can get them in almost every single country on earth.

I very much doubt that. Every country does not grow wheat and make buns from it. Nor do they all raise cattle for beef and dairy cattle for milk from which cheese is then made.
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#20
(22-Sep-2010, 03:09 AM)Shantanu Wrote: I very much doubt that. Every country does not grow wheat and make buns from it. Nor do they all raise cattle for beef and dairy cattle for milk from which cheese is then made.

Have you forgotten about a tiny development in human history called international trade? Are you aware of such things as international tourism, five star accommodations, gourmet catering for all international tastes, the vast industry network that moves trillions of tons of food around the world every year, etc etc? There is absolutely no doubt that in almost all countries on earth you can buy wheat, beef and cheese. In any case, hamburger buns do not necessarily require wheat, and cheese does not necessarily have to come from dairy cattle. So your argument was based on false premises to begin with.

Burgers are among the most international of foods today, thanks to globalization. It's as common as coca-cola. Beef producing countries export huge quantities of beef and even canned or frozen hamburgers and cheeseburgers every day, to be sold around the world. Most countries already have local burger joints in their major cities, selling freshly made burgers. Burgers were always available in India, in the bigger restaurants and hotels in Mumbai and Delhi, but also at some smaller tourist places. I have personally eaten burgers multiple times in India, in multiple cities. McDonalds, the world's largest burger chain, has franchises in 125 countries, although in India they don't use beef because they're trying to present a clean image to superstitious and often arrogant Hindus.
"Fossil rabbits in the Precambrian"
~ J.B.S.Haldane, on being asked to falsify evolution.
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#21
(19-Sep-2010, 01:42 AM)madhav Wrote: However, note that in India, certain castes and Muslims continued to eat beef throughout most historical eras as possibly cows produced more meat and were cheaper(?).


Eating beef in kerala has been very common for a long period (26 years for sure). I've noticed a few Hindu women who discard beef not necessarily for religious reasons. Thumbdown

Every youngster in Kerala knows what a BDF is (Beef Deep Fried) and is the most famous dish with their drinks Punk
[+] 1 user Likes Azad's post
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#22
(14-Sep-2010, 10:00 PM)Lije Wrote: Beef eating was not taboo in ancient India. But somewhere down the line killing cows (and other animals) became taboo. It may have been due to the popularity of schools of thought like Buddhism which promoted non-violence. And over time the practice has accrued irrational baggage (like decreeing the cow as holy).

The Greek historian Strabo wrote the following about the lifestyle of Brahmins during Alexander's time:

Quote:the philosophers tarry in a grove in front of the city in an enclosure merely commensurate with their needs, leading a frugal life, lying on straw mattresses and skins, abstaining from animal food and the delights of love, and hearkening only to earnest words, and communicating also with anyone who wishes to hear them; and that the hearer is forbidden either to talk or to cough or even to spit; and if he does, he is banished from association with them for that day as a man who has no control over himself; and that, after having lived in this way for thirty-seven years, they retire, each man to his own possessions, where they live more freely and under less restraint, p101wearing linen garments, ornaments of gold in moderation in their ears and on their hands, and partake of meats of animals that are of no help to man in his work, but abstain from pungent and seasoned food

This is from Book 15, Chapter 59 of the Geographica.
Apparently, grihastus are allowed to eat meat as long as it doesn't come from beasts of burden.
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#23
(14-Sep-2010, 06:43 PM)Shantanu Wrote: There is no such thing as atheistic advaita in Hinduism, yes it is a concept in Buddhism. In Hinduism, there is advaita, vishishta advaita and dvaita....However I agree that atheism as a thought is prevalent in Hinduism as the Samkya school of thought.

Hinduism is the most scientific and rational thought process that ever crossed the human mind of our great Rishis (Spiritual Scientists). Even great scientists like Albert Einstein, Robert Oppenheimer conceded this......This is because in Hinduism one has a right to question everything and one can start his spiritual journey by believeing in no God.

Coming to your question, Just like in Humans, where we have evolved humans and degraded humans as per the level of spiritual evolution, in animal kingdom too there are jivas in varying stages of their spiritual evolution starting from lowly insects and worms to animals like dogs, cows etc. Of these, the Cow is at the highest level of evolution in the animal kingdom and fit to evolve as a human in its next birth.

The Cow because of this is also capable of absorbing negative cosmic energies around it and hence the practice of bringing a cow while entering a new home or for any other purification ceremony. By eating the cow meat people will simply absorb this negative energies into their own body....

In Hinduism, there is scientific reason for everything and at the same time for layman to understand they also evolved social practices around them. Eg: Hence Lord Krishna tending to Cows.

In Hinduism we live with nature, give more and take less from nature. We do not control and subdue nature to destroy it to satisfy our greed. Forget about religion, is it ethical that an animal like the Cow that is so harmless, feeds us right from our infanthood, whose manure we use as the best organic fertilizer to produce the best organic food, how can someone even think of killing it for its meat?

Hence scientifically and ethically it is best to avoid cow meat.....Fish, Chicken (bird) are lower forms of animals and their meat may be eaten if one wants to eat meat....

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#24
(26-Feb-2011, 01:42 PM)aarun Wrote:
(14-Sep-2010, 06:43 PM)Shantanu Wrote: There is no such thing as atheistic advaita in Hinduism, yes it is a concept in Buddhism. In Hinduism, there is advaita, vishishta advaita and dvaita....However I agree that atheism as a thought is prevalent in Hinduism as the Samkya school of thought.

Hinduism is the most scientific and rational thought process that ever crossed the human mind of our great Rishis (Spiritual Scientists). Even great scientists like Albert Einstein, Robert Oppenheimer conceded this......This is because in Hinduism one has a right to question everything and one can start his spiritual journey by believeing in no God.

Coming to your question, Just like in Humans, where we have evolved humans and degraded humans as per the level of spiritual evolution, in animal kingdom too there are jivas in varying stages of their spiritual evolution starting from lowly insects and worms to animals like dogs, cows etc. Of these, the Cow is at the highest level of evolution in the animal kingdom and fit to evolve as a human in its next birth.

The Cow because of this is also capable of absorbing negative cosmic energies around it and hence the practice of bringing a cow while entering a new home or for any other purification ceremony. By eating the cow meat people will simply absorb this negative energies into their own body....

In Hinduism, there is scientific reason for everything and at the same time for layman to understand they also evolved social practices around them. Eg: Hence Lord Krishna tending to Cows.

In Hinduism we live with nature, give more and take less from nature. We do not control and subdue nature to destroy it to satisfy our greed. Forget about religion, is it ethical that an animal like the Cow that is so harmless, feeds us right from our infanthood, whose manure we use as the best organic fertilizer to produce the best organic food, how can someone even think of killing it for its meat?

Hence scientifically and ethically it is best to avoid cow meat.....Fish, Chicken (bird) are lower forms of animals and their meat may be eaten if one wants to eat meat....

The above has to be one of the most ludicrous excuses for an argument against beef-eating.
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